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Calm
'Suicidal Doesn't Always Look Suicidal'
21 June 2022 90s
Tears and smiles.
by Jason Stone

The advertising industry isn't always at its best when it turns its attention to serious matters, but when it gets it right, the impact can be truly astounding, and this film addressing the immensely difficult issue of suicide deserves a huge amount of praise for the sensitive and compassionate manner with which it has been made.

The specific point that it makes will have so much meaning to viewers whose lives have been affected by suicide that it may be too painful for them to watch. But, it seems likely that they will nonetheless support its existence because of the importance of its message: that people on the brink of suicide don't necessarily look as though that is where they are stood.

This film accompanies an exhibition of photographs which were, in each case, the last known image of someone who took their own life. There is no hint of sullenness or depression on their faces, and this provides a valuable warning about the nature of the suicidal mindset. In many instances, someone who has taken the decision to end their life will feel unburdened by it, and this will manifest itself as a lightness of mood.

It's worth pointing out that, of course, those who are successfully recovering from suicide iterations may also feel unburdened... so, this is complicated terrain. But, that's the point. Our preconceptions about suicide, formed by its depiction in film and television dramas, can be one-dimensional, but – as anyone who has been touched by it can testify – it is rarely a linear journey into total despondency.

Director Max Fisher and editor James Rosen both deserve a lot of credit for measuring the material and presenting it with the utmost sensitivity. After all, it wouldn't take much to sensationalise this idea and add to the guilt inevitably felt by those who have lost a loved one to suicide.

Max Fisher, alongside Richard Brim and the other creatives at adam&eveDDB who brought this project to fruition must, we'd imagine, approach the release of work like this with huge trepidation. It is a huge responsibility, and if the response on social media suggested that they'd misjudged their approach then it would be devastating. It will be a relief then for them to see that the comments from the public have been hugely empathetic, and many have confirmed the truth of the film. This is not a triumph or even a vindication, but it reveals the importance of this message and the tremendous skill with which it has been imparted. There is no greater reward for its makers than that.

Music: 'Bring Me Sunshine' - Beth McCarthy

Product Category: Charities

Territory: UK



adam&eveDDB
CCO: Richard Brim
ECD: Antony Nelson
ECD: Mike Sutherland
Creative: Andy Clough
Creative: Richard McGrann
Producer: Amy Simmons
Director: Max Fisher (Rogue Films)
DOP: Jim Jolliffe (Vision)

Final Cut
Editor: James Rosen

Rascal Post
Colourist: James Bamford

Wave
Sound: Parv Thind
Sound: Jeff Smith

  Calm - 'Suicidal Doesn't Always Look Suicidal'


Calm
'Suicidal Doesn't Always Look Suicidal'
21 June 2022 90s

Tears and smiles.

The advertising industry isn't always at its best when it turns its attention to serious matters, but when it gets it right, the impact can be truly astounding, and this film addressing the immensely difficult issue of suicide deserves a huge amount of praise for the sensitive and compassionate manner with which it has been made.

The specific point that it makes will have so much meaning to viewers whose lives have been affected by suicide that it may be too painful for them to watch. But, it seems likely that they will nonetheless support its existence because of the importance of its message: that people on the brink of suicide don't necessarily look as though that is where they are stood.

This film accompanies an exhibition of photographs which were, in each case, the last known image of someone who took their own life. There is no hint of sullenness or depression on their faces, and this provides a valuable warning about the nature of the suicidal mindset. In many instances, someone who has taken the decision to end their life will feel unburdened by it, and this will manifest itself as a lightness of mood.

It's worth pointing out that, of course, those who are successfully recovering from suicide iterations may also feel unburdened... so, this is complicated terrain. But, that's the point. Our preconceptions about suicide, formed by its depiction in film and television dramas, can be one-dimensional, but – as anyone who has been touched by it can testify – it is rarely a linear journey into total despondency.

Director Max Fisher and editor James Rosen both deserve a lot of credit for measuring the material and presenting it with the utmost sensitivity. After all, it wouldn't take much to sensationalise this idea and add to the guilt inevitably felt by those who have lost a loved one to suicide.

Max Fisher, alongside Richard Brim and the other creatives at adam&eveDDB who brought this project to fruition must, we'd imagine, approach the release of work like this with huge trepidation. It is a huge responsibility, and if the response on social media suggested that they'd misjudged their approach then it would be devastating. It will be a relief then for them to see that the comments from the public have been hugely empathetic, and many have confirmed the truth of the film. This is not a triumph or even a vindication, but it reveals the importance of this message and the tremendous skill with which it has been imparted. There is no greater reward for its makers than that.

Music: 'Bring Me Sunshine' - Beth McCarthy

Product Category: Charities

Territory: UK



adam&eveDDB
CCO: Richard Brim
ECD: Antony Nelson
ECD: Mike Sutherland
Creative: Andy Clough
Creative: Richard McGrann
Producer: Amy Simmons
Director: Max Fisher (Rogue Films)
DOP: Jim Jolliffe (Vision)

Final Cut
Editor: James Rosen

Rascal Post
Colourist: James Bamford

Wave
Sound: Parv Thind
Sound: Jeff Smith

Calm 21 June 2022
'Suicidal Doesn't Always Look Suicidal' 90s

Tears and smiles.

by Jason Stone

The advertising industry isn't always at its best when it turns its attention to serious matters, but when it gets it right, the impact can be truly astounding, and this film addressing the immensely difficult issue of suicide deserves a huge amount of praise for the sensitive and compassionate manner with which it has been made.

The specific point that it makes will have so much meaning to viewers whose lives have been affected by suicide that it may be too painful for them to watch. But, it seems likely that they will nonetheless support its existence because of the importance of its message: that people on the brink of suicide don't necessarily look as though that is where they are stood.

This film accompanies an exhibition of photographs which were, in each case, the last known image of someone who took their own life. There is no hint of sullenness or depression on their faces, and this provides a valuable warning about the nature of the suicidal mindset. In many instances, someone who has taken the decision to end their life will feel unburdened by it, and this will manifest itself as a lightness of mood.

It's worth pointing out that, of course, those who are successfully recovering from suicide iterations may also feel unburdened... so, this is complicated terrain. But, that's the point. Our preconceptions about suicide, formed by its depiction in film and television dramas, can be one-dimensional, but – as anyone who has been touched by it can testify – it is rarely a linear journey into total despondency.

Director Max Fisher and editor James Rosen both deserve a lot of credit for measuring the material and presenting it with the utmost sensitivity. After all, it wouldn't take much to sensationalise this idea and add to the guilt inevitably felt by those who have lost a loved one to suicide.

Max Fisher, alongside Richard Brim and the other creatives at adam&eveDDB who brought this project to fruition must, we'd imagine, approach the release of work like this with huge trepidation. It is a huge responsibility, and if the response on social media suggested that they'd misjudged their approach then it would be devastating. It will be a relief then for them to see that the comments from the public have been hugely empathetic, and many have confirmed the truth of the film. This is not a triumph or even a vindication, but it reveals the importance of this message and the tremendous skill with which it has been imparted. There is no greater reward for its makers than that.

Music: 'Bring Me Sunshine' - Beth McCarthy

Product Category: Charities

Territory: UK



adam&eveDDB
CCO: Richard Brim
ECD: Antony Nelson
ECD: Mike Sutherland
Creative: Andy Clough
Creative: Richard McGrann
Producer: Amy Simmons
Director: Max Fisher (Rogue Films)
DOP: Jim Jolliffe (Vision)

Final Cut
Editor: James Rosen

Rascal Post
Colourist: James Bamford

Wave
Sound: Parv Thind
Sound: Jeff Smith