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Jungkook
'Dreamers'
23 November 2022 4 mins 15s

K-pop superstars BTS are one of the biggest groups in the world, smashing language barriers and uniting their ridiculously dedicated fanbase (who even refer to themselves as ARMY) regardless of where they come from. However, this solo outing from youngest member Jungkook reminds everyone watching that the global darlings are very much South Korean.

For context, the singer is widely referred to as 'golden' within K-pop - a once in a generation combination of a talented singer, dancer, and good-looking personality. Comparable to Justin Bieber or Justin Timberlake at the height of their fame, it goes without saying that Jungkook's first solo release would be a global hit. So why seemingly waste it on a tainted World Cup? It's not like he needs the money.

The answer can probably be found in the difference of cultural norms between Korea and the West, as one of the major World Cup controversies - homophobia - is still taboo in Jungkook's homeland, and male and female music acts are still very much gender segregated. There's also the fact that a global stage is a prospect any emerging act would be hard-pressed to pass up, making it hard to judge a 25 year old pop artist to the same degree as established personalities like ten-grand shred-inspirer David Beckham.

Regardless of the reasoning behind taking the gig, it's hard not to feel like this is an artistically wasted opportunity. While fans rave about the complex dance routines and carefully executed cinematography of BTS promos, this film is a bland exploration of Qatar tourism spots - shot like an inoffensive, glossy brochure conspicuously devoid of women. It's exactly what you'd expect from the tournament, and that's why it feels like a damp squib for the artist formerly known as the next big thing.

Product Category: Promos

Territory: UK


  Jungkook - 'Dreamers'


Jungkook
'Dreamers'
23 November 2022 4 mins 15s

K-pop superstars BTS are one of the biggest groups in the world, smashing language barriers and uniting their ridiculously dedicated fanbase (who even refer to themselves as ARMY) regardless of where they come from. However, this solo outing from youngest member Jungkook reminds everyone watching that the global darlings are very much South Korean.

For context, the singer is widely referred to as 'golden' within K-pop - a once in a generation combination of a talented singer, dancer, and good-looking personality. Comparable to Justin Bieber or Justin Timberlake at the height of their fame, it goes without saying that Jungkook's first solo release would be a global hit. So why seemingly waste it on a tainted World Cup? It's not like he needs the money.

The answer can probably be found in the difference of cultural norms between Korea and the West, as one of the major World Cup controversies - homophobia - is still taboo in Jungkook's homeland, and male and female music acts are still very much gender segregated. There's also the fact that a global stage is a prospect any emerging act would be hard-pressed to pass up, making it hard to judge a 25 year old pop artist to the same degree as established personalities like ten-grand shred-inspirer David Beckham.

Regardless of the reasoning behind taking the gig, it's hard not to feel like this is an artistically wasted opportunity. While fans rave about the complex dance routines and carefully executed cinematography of BTS promos, this film is a bland exploration of Qatar tourism spots - shot like an inoffensive, glossy brochure conspicuously devoid of women. It's exactly what you'd expect from the tournament, and that's why it feels like a damp squib for the artist formerly known as the next big thing.

Product Category: Promos

Territory: UK



Jungkook 23 November 2022
'Dreamers' 4 mins 15s

by Syd Briscoe

K-pop superstars BTS are one of the biggest groups in the world, smashing language barriers and uniting their ridiculously dedicated fanbase (who even refer to themselves as ARMY) regardless of where they come from. However, this solo outing from youngest member Jungkook reminds everyone watching that the global darlings are very much South Korean.

For context, the singer is widely referred to as 'golden' within K-pop - a once in a generation combination of a talented singer, dancer, and good-looking personality. Comparable to Justin Bieber or Justin Timberlake at the height of their fame, it goes without saying that Jungkook's first solo release would be a global hit. So why seemingly waste it on a tainted World Cup? It's not like he needs the money.

The answer can probably be found in the difference of cultural norms between Korea and the West, as one of the major World Cup controversies - homophobia - is still taboo in Jungkook's homeland, and male and female music acts are still very much gender segregated. There's also the fact that a global stage is a prospect any emerging act would be hard-pressed to pass up, making it hard to judge a 25 year old pop artist to the same degree as established personalities like ten-grand shred-inspirer David Beckham.

Regardless of the reasoning behind taking the gig, it's hard not to feel like this is an artistically wasted opportunity. While fans rave about the complex dance routines and carefully executed cinematography of BTS promos, this film is a bland exploration of Qatar tourism spots - shot like an inoffensive, glossy brochure conspicuously devoid of women. It's exactly what you'd expect from the tournament, and that's why it feels like a damp squib for the artist formerly known as the next big thing.

Product Category: Promos

Territory: UK